Marketing Idea #104: Host a Field Trip

Marketing Ideas Field Trip

A great way to gain exposure and provide entertainment is to provide public tours of your facility. This is especially powerful for agriculture, arts and history, manufacturing; essentially, any place where something is grown, created or built. Try not to schedule such an event around any deadlines or busy periods you might have. Take your time with the tour to ensure your captive audience remains engaged and make sure to tailor your presentation to your audience. A class of first-graders may be more interested in learning how apple cider is made than watching giant steel presses shape red-hot bars into orthopedic implements.

Or, then again, maybe not..

Marketing Idea #22: Be a Panelist

Marketing Ideas Be a Panelist

If you are aware of an annual conference in your industry, offer to be a panelist. If it’s too late for this year’s conference, contact the event coordinators and voice your interest in attending next year’s conference. Anytime you’re able to present valuable ideas on your topic of specialty, you bring value to the effort of marketing yourself as an authority.

Tip: Nervous speaking in front of groups? Join Toastmasters to sharpen your public-speaking skills.

Marketing Idea #23: Teach a Class

Marketing Ideas Teach a Class

Teach a class at your local community college. For as little as one or two nights a week, take a few hours and guide a class through the curriculum of your specialty. Students want real-world information from someone who is spending most of his time in the trenches. Bring your successes and failures to them. Let them learn from your experience—and place another feather in your marketing cap while you’re doing it.

Marketing Idea #21: Speak at Career Day

Marketing Ideas Speak at Career Day

Be one of the speakers at your local high school on Career Day. This gets you practice in front of what could be a tough group. (If you can keep their attention and inspire them, you can approach any audience.) Be sure to research the school first. Have they won any big games lately? What sport season are they in? What are the students focused on? What are their challenges? How can you make your own story something they can relate to?

Remember: Your audience isn’t limited to the students; it includes their parents and the school faculty.