Distinct Qualities Employers Should Look for in Candidates

Looking for a job is not easy as it seems. With thousands of people finishing their degrees every year, getting hired means having to experience a competitive and stringent process. Obtaining your diploma is just a preliminary step. You have to research about companies, their values and mission, make and send applications, and ace the interview.

Several companies also require applicants to take a series of examinations to determine whether the applicant is the right person for the job. Employers are also wary about substance use, and that is why most job application processes require you to take a marijuana drug test and other screening exams for drug use. Even if you have the basic qualifications for the job, human resource personnel or employers will also try to look at the applicant’s standout qualities that could be helpful in performing the assigned task and in contributing to the company in general.

In other words, you have to let your prospective employers know what makes you unique from all the other applicants. Of course, it is incumbent upon the applicant to show these special qualities he or she possesses to the interviewer. It may even be contained in the résumé or the application itself. This article reminds you the best qualities needed to underscore in dealing with your future employer.

Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving Skills 

Tara L. Kuther, PhD, emphasized in an article that national surveys reflect the value given to critical thinking and problem-solving skills of applicants than the degrees they obtained in college. Knowledge about a particular field is a basic requirement in getting new hires, but having these distinct abilities, mainly cognitive and logical in nature, sets you apart from other people. Just like any organization, there are dozens of problems that require effective solutions. Even if the organization is operating normally, it cannot stay the same and has to continue evolving, which need some critical input using scientific methods to effect change.

Confidence

A sufficient dose of confidence, especially during job interviews, is something you need to have to secure your spot. The future employer should see that you know what you are talking about and you are ready to perform the job, and communicating these matters to the employer is not just the words you convey. It needs to be complemented with confidence in the manner you talk and the way you do nonverbal communication. If the employer sees you’re a confident person, he or she will not bother the idea of failure in your assigned tasks.

Team Player

Even if you are the smartest person among employees, your mental prowess is rendered ineffective if you cannot work well with your coworkers. Employers easily spot this essential trait in the line of affiliations you may have during the course of your educational or professional experience and the roles you have played in those organizations. You may also highlight during the job interviews specific situations that were difficult to handle, particularly in keeping harmony among workmates, and the role you have played in resolving issues.

Finding a job might be intimidating especially for the first-timers, so it is important to think carefully about what you put in your resume and to prepare for your job interview. Recall your key strengths and identify your weaknesses and work on both of them. Try to sell yourself but avoid sounding too overconfident. Lastly, always remember to be honest about what you say to your future employer.