Infographic: Top Tips to Make Videos Viral

Can You Really Plan for a Video to Go Viral?

The most straightforward answer to the question that this headline title poses is no, however, you can certainly put a strategic plan in place that will give your video content the best chance possible of going viral.

While the many ‘cat videos’ and ‘kids-saying-silly-things’ videos seem to be rife across YouTube, Vine, Instagram and other video based platforms, these are organic videos filmed by amateurs who essentially got lucky with their video view count. This is absolutely not the case when it comes to planning a video for commercial purposes.

The first thing to do when planning a video is to put a strategy in place. This strategy must cover the overall idea for the video (including how this idea is going to emotionally connect with its target audience) and how to go about laying down the framework for this and the angle you would take on it. For example, the average video that goes viral is anywhere between fifteen seconds and five minutes. In this timeframe, a video that has reached viral status e.g. has been shared thousands if not millions of times online, has either made its viewers laugh, cry, angry, or even annoyed, essentially any singular emotion that affects them enough to share it.

The angle you take on creating a video will depend on what story you want to tell and your brand. For example, Go Daddy who offers web hosting services, created a video that ran during the ad breaks of the 2013 Super Bowl. The purpose of the video was to promote its new website builder, but the story it told had nothing to do with websites. Instead Go Daddy decided to make its viewers feel uncomfortable by featuring a kiss between a super model and a nerd for well over half of the video which was very awkward to watch. Viewers could not help but watch it though as the crux of the video was that this kiss was completely unexpected and that is the angle Go Daddy took, to shock their viewers. The company ended up attracting 100,000 new customers after the video aired. Promotion of any video once it is made, is also a key element to include in your strategy.

For more top tips on how to plan out a video in the hopes it will go viral, see the below infographic created by One Productions, or read their more detailed guide.

marketing ideas top tips make viral videos infographic

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Color: One of the Greatest Marketing Ideas

color in marketing

In the world of marketing, there are good ideas, and there are great ideas. Yet, even some of the greatest marketing ideas change over time. One of the greatest marketing ideas that has changed over time is the simple concept of color.

Color to attract wealth

In ancient cultures colors were used to identify rank and socio-economic class. The Chinese, for example, reserved the use of yellow, jade, and red were usually reserved for the emperor, while deep purple, golds, and blue were reserved for the English royalty in later times.

In recent times these color fashions still evoke a sense of richness, quality, and high standards.

Psychological effects of color

The psychology of color is convoluted at best due to the differences in the way individuals and cultures as a whole may react to color. Despite of this, there are some general trends that can be used in marketing. For example, using red and yellow in your logo can evoke feelings of boldness and enthusiasm along with optimism and warmth. Using these trends to project the feeling you want may or may not produce the feelings you want, but it is sure that your logo will be more distinctive and memorable to your loyal clients.

Jogging memory with color

When you think of Cadbury, you might think of their recent legal battle for purple. Not just any purple, but a specific shade of purple that they have been using for centuries as their part of their logo, which naturally markets itself. When Cadbury won their legal battle for the trademark rights to their specific shade of purple, they reaffirmed the importance of color used in marketing and branding. The reason is simple: it jogs our memories when we see these familiar colors along the windows.

Times change, and so do people

While color is still an important aspect of marketing and branding, times are changing along with the impressions of the public. Now, people want more freedom of expression for themselves as the new wave of entrepreneurs start making their claim in the world. Color choices used in branding and marketing area making a swift change with the cultural desires. Etsy, for instance, is well known for their shabby chic, white-washed looks as well as their pastels as well as more unusual color combinations that travel in and out of style. To keep up with these changes, start up company, Insanitek, recommends that new business owners brand according to their own heart and soul, not uncertain psychology of color.

Color truly is one of the greatest marketing ideas of all times. It’s versatile, can speak volumes about your company and brand, market your products at a glance, and evoke thoughts and feelings in people as they look your way. So how do you use color efficiently in your marketing? Get in touch and we’ll help you figure out your best color schemes to use in your marketing.


More on using color…

Using color can be a powerful tool. It engages us, helps establish brand identities, market products and it increases our memory; but what about using black and white as color? We’ve grown so accustomed to adding color to almost everything, that B&W may seem uninteresting and boring. Black and white can be just as powerful and elegant as using colors. One benefit of using black and white is less expensive print costs. Using black and white together creates very sharp contrast and eye-catching appeal. Black goes well with almost every color except for very dark values and white goes good with almost any color.

White symbolizes: cleanliness, purity and innocence. In western cultures white is the color for brides, but in eastern cultures white symbolizes death.

Black symbolizes: mystery, elegance, and sophistication. In western cultures black symbolizes mourning.

Did you know?

Black is the absence of color and is therefore not a color. Black absorbs all the colors of the visible spectrum and reflects none of them to the eyes. Black can affect the perception of size and weight of objects and designs, making things appear smaller. White is the sum of all the colors, therefore white is a color. Light appears colorless or white. Sunlight is white light that is composed of all the colors of the spectrum. You can’t see the colors of sunlight except when atmospheric conditions bend the light rays and create a rainbow.

~Idea submitted by Graphic Communications, Inc., specializing in high-profile business solutions used to create a dialog between you and your market. Our services include vehicle graphics, interior graphics, exterior graphics, promotional graphics and design services. Graphic Communications believes small businesses should have access to the same comprehensive graphic services available to large businesses. Our goal is to provide these services without the high costs associated with the graphic arts industry. For more information, visit www.graphiccom.com.

True Colors: Using Color to Build Your Brand

by William Arruda

When you hear “big blue,” what company do you think of?

Some companies, organizations and even people are so consistent and steadfast in their use of color, that they almost own that color in our minds. Think Home Depot, Breast Cancer Awareness, the Artist Formerly Known as Prince.

Some companies actually do own their colors. Tiffany, for example, has registered its trademark robin’s egg blue as a brand asset.

As marketers, you know that color is an important brand asset. It helps clients and prospects recognize your company or product. But color can be used to support goals way beyond just recognition. It can be used to evoke emotion and build that all-important connection with the people who surround your brand.

You can use color to further differentiate your organization from your competitors, revitalize an aging product and engage and unite your employees, partners and customers. When you go beyond the traditional use of color, you can make incredible strides in achieving your goals.

When I worked for the software company Lotus, our color was yellow. Not just yellow—our yellow was a custom color called Lotus yellow.

This unique color was so important to Lotus that our Creative Director, Vartus—a strong brand herself—went to tremendous lengths to ensure that it was being used properly on everything from brochures to signage to coffee mugs.

Every print job cost extra because we had to add our custom color to the standard four-color process. But the cost was just a small investment in an incredibly powerful brand asset. The whole organization understood the importance of yellow and worked to ensure its abundant and appropriate use.

The Lotus corporate color was originally blue. But it changed to yellow when we moved our products into retail. Yellow boxes are more likely to be taken off the shelf, so Lotus Yellow was born. But it was not through retail sales that the yellow had its most dramatic effect. It was with the larger Lotus brand community.

Color activates your brand community

When I first joined the company, I was hit with yellow from all angles; it seemed a bit excessive. But when I went on my first qualitative brand audit, I saw first-hand how powerful color can be. Respondents in cities from San Francisco to Sao Paolo shouted “yellow” when asked, “When you think about Lotus, what first comes to mind.”

And yellow was consistent with our brand attributes: bright, positive, warm, visionary. Our yellow awareness was so powerful, that when we launched TV ads in a letterbox format (the ad was shown between two horizontal bars of yellow) people could identify that they came from Lotus without even watching them. Not bad for general brand awareness. Of course, we hoped people would watch the ads, too!

In the marketing department, we used yellow as a way to express the brand internally. We developed communications and Web-based materials that explained the Lotus brand through creative uses of yellow. Everyone in the company bought into Lotus yellow and proactively supported its liberal use. We even had a “yellow” video that was shown to all new hires during orientation.

From accounting to product development, employees considered how to include some yellow in their day-to-day activities. And business partners and alliances joined in, too. The color yellow, as strange as it seems, was a powerful and unifying force among all members of the Lotus brand community.

Color choice can’t be taken lightly

Choosing a color can be as challenging as it is important. There is a whole psychology behind color. And colors mean different things in different countries. Lotus yellow, for example, had a different formula in Japan than it did in the rest of the world. So choosing color for your organization or product is not something you do lightly.

Selecting a color to represent a person can be an even greater challenge according to Brian Wu, Partner and Design Director for Brandego, a company that builds Web portfolios for business people.

“When we build a Web site for an executive, one of the key decisions has to do with color,” he says. “What color or palette of colors will support the client’s personal brand attributes and set an appropriate emotional tone—in the way that music colors movie titles?”

Do you know what color or color palette best represents your personal brand?

The most common logo color for American corporations is blue. But blue is probably more often associated with IBM than any other brand.

And IBM takes full advantage of its unique relationship with blue. You will see blue on the corporate Web site, in all presentations, on corporate materials, on signage and in the names of many of their programs: Blue Gene, Deep Blue and Extreme Blue (just to name a few).

While IBM is associated with the most common corporate color, UPS has chosen one of the least-used colors (brown) and turned it into a tremendous brand asset. Its Valentines Delivery press release was titled “Roses are Brown.” In its latest series of ads, it replaced the corporate name with “brown” in the tag line: “What can brown do for you?”

According to color expert Jacci Howard Bear, brown represents steadfastness, simplicity, friendliness and dependability—perfect for a logistics company. These brand attributes are closely connected with the UPS brand promise. Brown is also a highly differentiated color. Can you think of another organization that uses brown?

Color supports differentiation

The ability to identify a company by its brand color is amazing. When you are standing at the bus stop at the airport waiting for your rental car shuttle, you know whether you are looking for the yellow, red or green bus. It’s more difficult to identify Budget (orange and blue) and Alamo (yellow and blue). Multiple colors seem to be harder to own—unless, of course, you’re Apple.

The rainbow colors are perfect for the Apple brand. Creative. Different. Diverse. Not an inexpensive proposition from a printing perspective, but extremely valuable from a branding angle.

Color can have a double effect

Some organizations and products have colorful names: Orange (the European telecommunications company), jetBlue, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, the Red Cross, the Yellow Pages, Blue Cross and Blue Shield. They all benefit doubly from the emotion-creating power of color.

And the music industry seems to have a strong desire to connect sound with color: the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Pink, Green Day, Deep Purple, Simply Red, and the Indigo Girls are just a few of the artists with colorful names.

Although blue is the most popular corporate color in the US, red seems to win out when it comes to company names that include color. Red Herring, the Red Cross, Red Envelope and Red Hat Software are just a few of the companies that chose to associate themselves with this color, which often connotes warmth, excitement and aggressiveness.

Color supports a renaissance

M&M-Mars certainly knows the value of color. It revitalized a brand that was at the end of its product life cycle by holding a contest to find the next M&M color. It turned out to be blue, and they launched an extremely successful ad campaign where the other M&Ms, who were jealous of the new blue, would hold their breath so that they too would turn blue.

That was so successful for M&Ms-Mars that it has continued to use color as a way to generate more interest in the brand. In 1992, it held another contest to choose a color. Now M&Ms have lost their color entirely. They are black and white, and so is their packaging. We as consumers can help find their colors again as part of the “Help Find Our Colors” contest.

The potential that color has to unite your organization and support your brand-building activities is tremendous. There is almost no end to the creative ways that it can be used to attain your goals. So think about whether you are getting the maximum value from your corporate color and if necessary, make a plan to color your brand.

Here are 10 ways to make the most of color

Color is powerful. It evokes emotion. It is an important brand tool, so use it wisely. To make the most of your color, ensure that it…

  1. Supports your brand attributes
  2. Is relevant to your target audience
  3. Is always the same shade and hue
  4. Is visible to all members of your brand community, inside and outside the company
  5. Is understood and appropriately used by all employees
  6. Is featured on all your communications materials and sales tools
  7. Is different from your competitors’ colors
  8. Works in all parts of the world where you plan to do business
  9. Is applied to more than just your logo
  10. Comes with guidelines on its use for partners and affiliates
William Arruda is the personal branding guru and founder of Reach, a global leader in personal branding, and coauthor of Career Distinction: Stand Out By Building Your Brand (www.careerdistinction.com).

Harmonizing Your 2013 Marketing Strategy is Simple, Really

2013 marketing ideas

Harmonize your marketing channels by “seamlessly coordinating messages and offers across all offline and digital channels that include: point of sale, direct mail, call center, social, mobile, web and email,” suggests Chief Marketer Network. Email campaigns alone will not get you noticed. With the Information Age comes easier accessibility to any businesses that are active online. With that comes the challenge to get recognized and stand out from the rest. It’s now more important than ever to align your message/brand across all platforms in order to reach a diverse demographic.

Streamline Your Marketing Strategy

What exactly are the best marketing tactics to gain recognition for your brand? It’s actually simpler than you might think. Mix your campaigns by sending quality, focused direct marketing through the mail, followed by a smart email campaign and then an astute social platform. By tapping into physical mail as well as email methods and social media, you’re maximizing the potential of your marketing campaigns. And, if you need an advertising revolution, the unconventional is becoming the norm with guerrilla marketing. While it may seem simple, don’t miss a step.

Direct Mail

Small businesses are now coordinating and streamlining marketing messages across different advertising platforms. In-house organization systems such as Pitney Bowes mail services give easy access to marketing and communications tools that help small businesses do this. Don’t send direct mail to just anyone. Study demographics and target market your print collateral. You can gather this information from InfoUSA and USA Data to gather specific leads more likely to benefit you with this method of advertising. Small business consultant Evan Carmichael suggest you keep these things in mind when creating your direct mail:

  • Set an objective
  • Include an incentive to take action
  • Proofread, edit, proofread and edit again
  • Write a captivating headline
  • Do a test run

Phone

What happened to picking up the phone and calling someone? It’s not dead—personal communication, you know. Be sure to target this type of marketing specific to geo- and demographics. Don’t call a household in Florida and offer them a Jack-in-the-box coupon. The closest location is two states away in either direction. However, you could call a household in Miami and ask them to take a quick survey on their most recent experience with your new Miami business-finder app.

Web

Getting active on the web is imperative in the 21st century. Create a unique website and coordinating landing pages. All of these forms of contact can lead customers to your landing page, which captures their information and helps you convert them into legitimate leads. People need prompts. They need to be directed through the magical maze of the web. You don’t want to run the risk of getting them lost in your site and eventually directing themselves away.

Social

Become active on social media sites like Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Add sharing buttons to your email newsletters and your web content for social media integration. You have to be a part of the game. Crowd-sourcing is the new word-of-mouth. Once you are placing yourself on several social platforms, you will have people sharing your valuable content and traffic will increase. If you’re not social, you might be left out of the game.

Mobile

SoLoMo marketing — social, local, mobile. By activating a mobile device at any onsite location, one can instantly be connected to his social graph. Utilize smart phones in your small business marketing plan by incorporating QR codes in your direct mail, email and web materials in order to entice current and potential customers to your site by offering them reasonable offers and rewards.

Email

Don’t promise something you can’t deliver. (Rule No. 1: If you say “Free!” it better be free.) Email is a powerful tool if you know how to use it, especially if you have a small company with a smaller marketing budget. Getting crafty with your headline can lure current and potential customers in just as easily as a bad subject line can get your efforts deleted in one click of a button. Forbes reports that adding personalization in the subject line increased open rates by an average of 40 percent. Consider making an offer the customer can’t refuse in the subject line like, “Private Invite: Respond before Friday at five.”

Guerrilla Marketing

When all else remains stagnate, implement the outrageous … release the beast. Small-scale stunts offer a low-cost solution to your marketing woes. Remember 2002, when Bernard “The Executioner” Hopkins sported a goldenpalace.com henna body tattoo on his back during a middleweight boxing match? A measly $100,000 helped that company become a household name. Guerrilla marketing intercepts public spaces and engages the consumer to have a memorable brand experience.

POS (Point of Sale)

While having an inventory system may seem not to have anything to do with marketing, it has everything to do with keeping your business running seamlessly. This in turn gives you an advantage because your processes are smooth, allowing you time to focus on your marketing. Having point-of-sale system software is fundamental in centralizing your business. Organizing your brand and inventory can help determine what type of marketing is working and what is not. Inventory control is essential in maintaining the efficiency of your operations, allowing you to make better use of your staff.

nonprofit affiliate network

Stephanie Cole is a freelance writer from North Carolina.

Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival, March 3, 2013

Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival

Welcome to the March 3, 2013 edition of the Marketing Ideas 101 blog carnival. This edition was originally scheduled for February 5, but.. well.. best laid plans and all. Thank you all for your submissions (over 50!) Here are the 14 finalists. Enjoy!

Matt

Blogging & Social Media

Jon Rhodes presents How To Get A Guest Post Published posted at Affiliate Help!, saying, “This article shows you some of the thought processes of a guest post publisher, which can be looked at to help increase your chances of getting published.”

Dana Sitar presents 6 1/2 Things To Stop Doing on Twitter in 2013 posted at DIY Writing, saying, “As much as I love all my tweeps, though, I can’t help but still be completely annoyed at some common bad practices on the network. I know if you’re committing these faux pas you probably don’t even realize how annoying they are, so I’m sharing this post to enlighten you and give you a chance to make things right as we start fresh this new year.”

Meg A. presents How to increase your online influence in just 30 minutes a day posted at Bloom Online, saying, “Three simple ideas to help you build your online influence and reach, build your network and increase your sales.”

Astrid van Dorst presents Further your Social Media Plan posted at Cloud Analysts, saying, “30+ tips to further your social media plan, from the strategic to the practical.”

Ink’d Content, LLP presents Facebook Releases Killer Rabbit posted at Ink’d Content, saying, “Facebook made big waves last week by announcing its first new product in seven years: Graph Search… and it subverts the need for the rest of the Internet.”

Deena presents Twitter Primer for Authors posted at E-BookBuilders, saying, “This was a beginners informational post I did for authors but the same information applies for small businesses just getting started with Twitter as part of their social media efforts.”

Creativity & Inspiration

Byteful Travel presents How to Release Attachment to Outcomes & Embrace Joy in the Present Moment posted at Byteful Travel, saying, “Have you ever felt like you weren’t doing enough? That, no matter how much you created, you could still do better? Have you ever had a feeling of quiet doom in the back of your mind? I know I have, and the good news is, you’re definitely not alone. It seems to be pretty common among creative and intelligent types, and today we’re going to explore the antidote: non-attachment.”

Marketing Best Practices

grimm560 presents This Should Be Called 12 Essential Marketing Tips For Up And Coming Artists, But Its Not posted at Grimm Factor Music, saying, “This post was created to give some ideas to up and coming musicians that may not know how to best set up their inbound marketing campaigns or if their efforts thus far have not gotten them far.”

Angela Giles presents Tweeting Tips For Newbies posted at Showcasing Women, saying, “This is an article I wrote for best practices for tweeting. Thanks for the consideration. Learn. Share. Thrive. Angela!”

Marketing Ideas

Theresa Torres presents 6 Tips for Pitching Your Startup to the Media posted at Business 2 Community, saying, “If you’re a business owner, there are traditional and nontraditional ways that you can use to get the word out about your product or service. Here are some tips to help you get customers’ attention better.”

Peter J. Buscemi presents Leverage Marketing, Sales Development, Sales Enablement & Executives to Sell posted at Four Quadrant, saying, “Every company has a finite set of resources so it easy to understand why each functional area is usually at or near full capacity with Sales being no exception.Assume the sales pipeline has six primary phases that include: qualified opportunity, forecast, technical win, executive win, contracts and closed won.”

SEO & Driving Traffic

Chief Dodo presents See How Easily You Can Get More Traffic With 6 Simple Steps posted at Dodo University, saying, “An Article Highlighting 6 tips on how to increase the amount of traffic to any blog.”

Susan Wowe presents SEO Tips | Guest Posts For A Win-Win posted at Online Business – Make Money Online, saying, “Use guest blogging to build up traffic to your websites.”

Harrison presents Link Building Demystified for Small Business (VIDEO) posted at eSpire Marketing, saying, “Find out what link building is, why it is important to your small business, how it drives traffic, and where to get started in this week’s edition of Whiteboard Wednesday.”

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival, December 18, 2012

Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival

Welcome to the December 18, 2012 edition of the Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival.

Blogging

Bill Smith presents Breaking The Barriers Of Language With WordPress Transposh posted at Captured Technology, saying, “Some websites have good content however, not all of them get high rankings because of the different languages that people use when writing.”

Jeremy Biberdorf presents It Is Your Blogging Journey, You Make The Rules posted at Modest Money, saying, “There are things where there is no set blueprint that you need to follow. You are free to do what works for you and sometimes just wing it. Blogging is one of those things. There may be strategies that have worked well for others, but how you approach it is completely up to you.”

Arnel Ariate presents Blogging for Money posted at Money Soldiers, saying, “I treat blogging as my business. Just like any other businesses, blogging needs customers. In this article, I talked about the different ways I did to increase my blog’s readership.”

Marketing Ideas

Matt Schoenherr presents How to Drive Traffic to Your Blog posted at Marketing Ideas 101, saying, “Driving traffic to your blog can be one of the most difficult things to do. With so many blogs starting up each day, it’s difficult to differentiate yourself and your blog from the others online and to culminate an effective online presence. While it does take hard work and perseverance, driving and maintaining traffic to your blog can be done by utilizing a few key practices to your daily blogging habits.”

Catherine presents Grow Your Business with Evolved Marketing and Advertising by Webshark 360 -Legal Brand Development, Marketing and Design.

David Leonhardt presents Does Google think it’s God? posted at David Leonhardt’s SEO and Social Media Marketing, saying, “Google looks at your website on the Internet that same way as God looks at you. Google sees what our websites are really made of – the code, the content, the information.”

Small Business Marketing

David Leonhardt presents What marketing experience means posted at David Leonhardt’s SEO and Social Media Marketing, saying, “Experience does not mean you know everything. It does, however, mean that you have a pretty good idea where to look and how to evaluate what you find.”

Patricia Lotich presents Customer Questions – Are You Paying Attention? posted at The Thriving Small Business, saying, “Another great opportunity to understand a consumer’s experience is by taking advantage of the questions customers ask. When a customer asks a question, it provides a great learning opportunity. What we learn from customer questions is very valuable and should be used as yet another tool to improve products and services.”

Jon Rhodes presents Want High Affiliate Sales? Build Up Your Trust posted at Affiliate Help!, saying, “This article shows why it is so important to build trust when selling affiliate products online.”

baliconfederate presents So you Should Consider your Shipping Cost as a Marketing Cost? posted at WebandRank.com Blog, saying, “consider shipping cost like marketing investment.”

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of the Marketing Ideas 101 Blog Carnival using our carnival submission form. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.

Marketing Idea #202: Pretend You’re a Celebrity

marketing ideas be a celebrity

LOL. From YouTube:

“On the night of July 27th, 2012, a huge prank was pulled in New York City and this is the video of what took place. Brett Cohen came up with a crazy idea to fool thousands of pedestrians walking the streets of Times Square into thinking he was a huge celebrity, and it worked! Not only did it work, it caused quite a stir. This social experiment, of sorts, makes a profound statement about how modern culture is so attracted to pop culture, without any real credibility needed.”

No kidding. Enjoy!

Matt

Marketing Idea #18: Start an Affiliate Program

marketing ideas affiliate programs

Create a referral or affiliate program. Otherwise known as making it worth other people’s time to help you reach new clients. The goal of a referral program is to create revenue or to provide some other incentive for those who help you reach more people.

Example: Dreamscape Multimedia offers a referral program with our web hosting service and makes it free to sign up using a simple one-page form. We call it our Prosperity program, as it pays a hefty 50 percent monthly commission* on web hosting accounts you refer to us.

*Giving back 50 percent of a revenue stream may not be possible for your company. Determine what a responsible return might look like, and proceed conservatively at first.

Great Marketing Ideas: Be a Mom for a Moment

Marketing Example Unicef Mom

Unicef Finland wanted to raise awareness for children’s rights and raise funds with a minimum cost. They also wanted to reinforce their position as an organization dedicated specifically to children’s welfare. There are over 145 million orphaned or abandoned children all around the world.

“By supporting Unicef anyone can be a mother to them, just for a moment.”

To provoke and create discussion they started by abandoning sound-equipped (crying) baby strollers in 14 cities. Inside the stroller was a note with the message:

Thank you for caring, we hope there is more people like you.
Be a mom for a moment.
Unicef

Media and public reaction was overwhelming. They flooded all the major TV, radio and web news. Estimated media reach was over 80% of Finnish population after just two days.

Advertising Agency: Taivas, Helsinki, Finland
Art Directors: Jyri Niemi, Anna-Mia Alanko
Copywriter: Adele Enersen
Account Supervisors: Heini Häyrinen, Joanna Kokonmäki
Production company: ADDlife Finland

marketing ideas ebook divider

References

I Believe in Advertising. Unicef Finland: Mom. March 31, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.ibelieveinadv.com/2009/03/unicef-finland-mom/.

It’s Good to be Small Sometimes

Small business owners and start-ups actually have something of an advantage over larger corporations. When a start-up makes a marketing mistake on a shoestring budget, it’s easily corrected as long as it’s dealt with quickly. When a large corporation puts millions of dollars behind a mistake, the mess and long-term damage to their self-image is much more costly to clean up.

Best Marketing for Realtors? Word-of-Mouth Referrals

Marketing Ideas for Realtors

As a group dedicated to finding people homes, realtors provide a pretty valuable service to others. One of the best ways realtors can drum up extra business is by going above and beyond for their current customers. Word-of-mouth referrals are one of the best forms of advertising and people will talk about their realtor for years; whether good or bad. At the close of a sale, make sure to also ask your clients for a testimonial for you to use in your marketing literature.

How to Use Blog Comments to Build Backlinks

Marketing Ideas Blog Comments

When conducting search engine marketing, the quality and quantity of backlinks leading into your website provide the search engines something upon which to base your authority metric, bumping you up in the search results.

When making blog comments on sites that compliment your own, remember to mention your keywords 2-3 times, as well as your location (if pertinent.) Don’t be spammy. Make sure you are bringing value–or at the very least, validation–to the author’s blog.

Have patience: sometimes it takes a while for comments to be approved by the blog owners (if ever at all.)

A Word About Affiliate Products

If you are aware of products that compliment your own services and if these products are offered under an affiliate program, consider joining the affiliate program and listing the product(s) on your website. By doing so, you bring more value to your visitors’ experience of your website while welcoming the added prosperity that may result when a visitor agrees enough with your recommendation to vote with their dollars.