Lead Generation in a Mobile World

lead generation in a mobile world

In the world of sales, there are two goals for your marketing plan: positive brand awareness and lead generation. Today’s internet-based society and mobile device usage has blended these two objectives into one overarching business conversation that needs to be navigated wisely to achieve the desired results.

The New Landscape

Online advertising started in earnest in the early 1980s when Prodigy began displaying banner ads to its subscribers. Between the ’80s and the early 2000s, online advertising campaigns paralleled traditional paper marketing, using discount-driven ads and brand awareness pieces to drive sales.

The rise of social media changed this by demanding a two-way conversation over these single-direction marketing statements. Mobile technology made marketing communication instantaneous. Twitter became the carrier of customer service messages, both good and bad. Facebook is now the most relied upon place for reviews and product opinions. Today, leads are no longer the final product of marketing but just part of the overall relationship that you develop with new and existing customers.

Defining a Lead

A lead used to be a linear relationship between a piece of marketing and the interest shown by a potential customer. In short, it was a potential contact. Now, with a billion people on Facebook alone, most of your potential contacts are not actionable contacts.

Interest is difficult to measure in this nonlinear connected environment. Initially, lead generation was part of a reverse marketing approach in which the company wanted the prospect to seek out the business. Now the prospective customer is searching for active conversations about your company and they may or may not include you.

Your job in lead generation is to make sure that you are at the center of these digital dialogues. To do this, you must understand who you are and what you have to offer. You need to analyze your business and its foundational beliefs and then insert yourself into conversations based on these principles.

The Rise in new Technology

Social media lets users separate themselves from their physical person if they want. They can create profiles that portray an image even if it is not real. The use of mobile devices has counteracted this, linking the physical people with their cyber selves.

How? The latest iPhones, like the iPhone 7 Plus, now have technology that allow the devices to interact with their environment through Bluetooth signals. When users are near your business or inside your store, you can take these previously online-only marketing conversations into a physical environment, allowing you to react to location and shopping patterns of real customers. As a lead generation tool, new technology like iBeacon is extremely powerful. You can invite customers into your shop while they are walking by or entice them with a special promotion. For better lead generation, look into some of the newest geofencing advertising opportunities.

Holistic Lead Generation

Ultimately, the best lead generation campaign takes into account where the prospect is, both mentally and physically. You want to be in a positive, relationship-building conversation with potential customers and their support network while seeing their location-based shopping patterns. Trying to sell a house in Houston to a couple looking for a home in Boston is useless, but being an expert in housing is invaluable. To best generate leads, create your online image, become part of the conversation and know your customer base.


With a Bachelors in Physics and a MBA, Paul Reyes-Fournier worked in aerospace and education but his passion to do something good for the world led him to a career in the non-profit sector where he has served as the CFO of a multi-million dollar rehab agency. Paul has lobbied Congress for funds to help homeless individuals and served on the BOD for social service organizations.

Infographic: In-Store Retail Apps Are Heating Up

The last decade has seen a huge change in the landscape of retail worldwide. E-commerce websites have become pretty much ubiquitous and many consumers source most of what they need online. This shift in consumer behavior has been heavily influenced by the improvement in technology in terms of computers but most especially on phones. Previously, cell phones were used predominantly for making and receiving calls or text messages. Today, this couldn’t be more different.

Cell phones of today are referred to as smartphones and rightly so as there is little that they don’t do or influence in day to day life. Smartphones have radically come down in price also and so they are accessible to a larger portion of people.

The proliferation then of phone and tablet apps could be seen as another problem for offline or bricks and mortar retailers but in actual fact this need not be the case. With greater access to consumers, offline retailers need to look at this as an opportunity for them to reach out to consumers like never before. Research shows that consumers that use and engage on apps are more likely to spend higher amounts of money so it is definitely something that should not be ignored. Retailers need to focus on how phone and tablet apps can make the retail experience a better one when the customers are actually in the store in order to capitalize on the changing times.

This infographic from Storetraffic Retail Solutions aims to show how the app revolution is not confined to online retail, meaning that it is something that offline retail store owners should not ignore. Check it out to learn more!

infographic in store retail

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Infographic: Mobile Market Domination

Why Your Business Needs A Mobile Marketing Strategy

People are no longer only relying on their computers or a landline to stay connected with friends, family, and businesses. Instead, people are using mobile devices to build relationships with others and make purchasing decisions each day.

infographic Mobile Market Domination

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It’s predicted that by 2017, there will be 10 billion connected mobile devices. Additionally, more than half of all mobile devices will be smartphones. As mobile continues to dominate the market, brands will need to implement a mobile marketing strategy that will help them reach their customers.

Mobile is becoming an integral part of marketing strategies because it’s changing the way people consume content. According to the infographic, 51 percent of mobile traffic is mobile and 90 percent of tweets are from a mobile device. Clearly, mobile is making a huge impact on how brands should create content for their customers.

Mobile is also important for brands because people are using their smartphones to make purchasing decisions. In fact, four out of five consumers have used their smartphone to make a purchasing decision. Additionally, more than half of consumers believe mobile making shopping more enjoyable.

When people use their mobile devices for shopping, there are a number of things they look for. According to the infographic, 67 percent of consumers use their smartphones to search for a store’s location. Not only that, but 51 percent of consumers use their smartphones to research product information and 59 percent use them to compare prices.

Mobile domination is changing the way brands create exposure for their business and target customers. By creating a mobile strategy, your business will have the opportunity to create more awareness and build relationships with customers.

Have you had any luck marketing to a mobile audience?

marketing ideas, drive traffic, drive traffic to your website

Ivan Serrano is a social media, business and finance journalist living in the Bay Area of California. 

 

Did Motorola and Verizon Miss the Mark?

marketing ideas motorola ad

I’m not sure this ad achieves what Motorola and Verizon hoped to achieve. I don’t see people untethered by longer battery life; I see a digital culture of disconnect. No one is actually looking at each other. All eyes are on their phones. Yeesh. Is this what we’re becoming?

The digitally divided?

3 Reasons You’re Not Building a Mobile App

Marketing Ideas Mobile Web Apps

According to Tonia Zampieri, Mobile Strategist at Atlantic BT, “a full 50% of US adults own and use smartphones. This number jumps to over 75% for those under 44 years old. These numbers are only going up…” Yet, many organizations still have not chosen to enter the mobile fray. Here are a few reasons why I think small to medium-sized organizations of all types remain sluggish in their response to the mobile revolution.

Generation Gap or…

If you look at the demographic of individual donors who give $1,000 or more to any given cause, I’m betting most of them are over the age of 40-50 years. Indeed, I would also hazard a guess to say most nonprofit directors would be among this age range or older. Whether from a subtle, underlying apprehension to learn yet another technology that experience says will be outdated in two years, or maybe just out of pure wisdom, this older, more seasoned demographic tends to be slower at adopting the latest technologies, including mobile computing.

…Practical Priorities?

In the natural course of responding to today’s hectic schedules, I think most folks are still content with email at the desktop. Most C-level executives and program administrators I know don’t do much surfing from mobile (but they’re more than happy to check their email in the middle of a meeting!) If they’re not using the technology in that way, they have considerably less notion that others will use the technology in that way. When this is the case, a firm mobile strategy becomes less of a priority and the focus is placed on more familiar traditional strategies.

The Advent of Mobile-Friendly Web Design

Additionally, web technology is evolving in such a way as to compete with mobile apps. In the past, if you wanted a mobile-friendly website (which sometimes was what the client really wanted—not an app like they originally requested) you had to develop a whole new shell for the site’s content; if you were lucky enough to have a database-driven site. For those who had static websites, you had to create a whole new site and now you would be charged with the tedious task of maintaining two websites instead of one.

With more thoughtful design, we now have websites that collapse to fit a mobile format. These sites require no extra management to be mobile-friendly—you still manage a single site. Additionally, if you build a web application using the same mindfulness, now your web application can double as a “mobile app” (or, at least, a mobile-friendly app.) Obviously, there is a difference between this and a true mobile application, but for those on a budget (which I think describes most small to mid-size organizations,) this approach can help fulfill the mobile strategy they seek.

Afterglow

Ultimately, if you’re a small business or nonprofit interested in marketing online, you should be watching your web statistics on a weekly basis (at a minimum) to determine how much of your traffic is coming through mobile platforms. Whatever that number is now, you can bet it will only continue to grow as mobile computing becomes more popular and as the mobile-savvy population advances in their careers and influence.

marketing ideas mobile app divider

Reference

T. Zampieri. Unlike Facebook, Nonprofits Don’t Get an IPO. May 28 , 2012. Retrieved from http://www.atlanticbt.com/blog/unlike-facebook-nonprofits-dont-get-an-ipo.